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Tips for a Low Protein Friendly Halloween

Trick or Treat? When your child is on a low protein diet for an inborn error of metabolism, such as PKU, MSUD, TYR or HCU, sometimes the tricks feel safer than the treats.

Halloween celebrations that center on candy, food and snacks can be tough for kids on restricted diets –and tough for parents who want their children to fully enjoy the festivities.

But it is possible to have fun AND stay on a low protein diet this Halloween?

Here are a few tips, resources, and recipes to help you make it a healthy and happy Halloween.

    Safety First:

  • Be sure to talk with teachers and other parents about what your child can and cannot have at Halloween parties or school activities.

  • Talk with your child about the importance of staying on diet and remind them to check with you to determine if a particular food or candy is safe.

Now to the Fun Stuff:

▪ Get creative with Halloween giveaways. Have non-food treats to hand out at home or at school. Think dollar store toys, stickers, party favors, and coloring books.

▪ Plan an alternative activity to trick-or-treating, such as Halloween slumber party, game night, craft party, or a scavenger hunt.

▪ If there will be cakes or cookies at the party, take low-protein treats for your child to enjoy so that she doesn’t feel left out – Check out Maddy’s Low Protein Sugar Cookie Mix

▪ Consider having a “swap-party” where your child can swap candies she cannot have for “allowed” candies. This way everyone gets what they want!

▪ Make your child’s PKU formula festive! Serve it in a Halloween-themed cup, use fun straws, or add some orange food coloring.

Post Your Formula ‘Dressed-Up’ for Halloween and TAG Nutricia! 

#NutriciaMetabolicNutrition      

More Resources:

Our friends at HowMuchPHE.org have put together a great source to view the Protein and PHE content for common Halloween treats.*

View the Halloween Candy Guide from How Much PHE

Jack O’Lantern Cupcakes

jack-o-lantern-228Surprise that special someone or treat yourself to a Halloween cupcake. These cupcakes are made with Maddy’s Homestyle Yellow Cake Mix.  They are easy to make and great for home, work or parties.

cakePrep time: 5 minutes

Bake time: 30-35 minutes

Makes: 12 cupcakes

Serving Size: 1 cupcake ( 34 g of mix) You will need:

  •  1 can Maddy’s Yellow Cake Mix

  • 1 cup water

  •  1/3 cup vegetable oil

  1. Preheat oven to 350 F.  Grease bottom of cupcake tin.
  2. Stir cake mix, water and oil in a large bowl.
  3. Pour into 12 cupcake servings
  4. Bake for 30-35 minutes or until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean.
  5. Cool 10 minutes before removing from pan.
  6. Cool completely before frosting into your spooky treat.

Precautions
Must be used under strict medical supervision. Not intended as the sole source of nutrition. Not suitable for wheat-free diets.

Makes 12 Cupcakes

Nutrition Per serving
Calories 180
Protein 0.2 g
Phenylalanine 4 mg
Leucine 6 mg

Note:  Any additional frosting or decorations may add additional Protein or PHE, be sure to read labels and account for any topping or decorations.  Nutrition listed is for cake only.

*Nutricia North America is not affiliated with HowMuchPHE.org and has not independently verified the information on HowMuchPHE.org.

PKU Lunch Tips for Back-to-School

katieby – Katie Maquire, Adult with PKU – guest blogger

I don’t know about you, but it was pretty stressful for my parents sending me off to school in September knowing that I would be making many food choices on my own without them present.

back-to-school-imageALL children should learn to make healthy food choices. Children with PKU are no different. Learning to eat low protein and healthy can begin at a young age when you are grocery shopping or prepping food together in the kitchen.

PKU Friendly Lunch Tips for Back-to-School:

  • Pack lunch in fun, colorful containers in all different sizes.

  • Use an insulated lunch tote with ice packs to keep food and formula cool.

  • Make lunch colorful with a small amount of different veggies, such as baby carrots, cherry tomatoes, cucumbers, yellow peppers, etc.

  • Prepare, weigh and measure food ahead of time to speed up mornings.

  • Involve your child in shopping, prepping and weighing their own lunch.iStock_000015639017Medium

  • Give your child a low protein “surprise” snack, like Maddy’s Low Protein Sugar Cookies.

  • Write a special good job note or include a sticker 2-3 times a week.

  • Send formula in a fun re-usable drink container or sports bottle.

  • Plan ahead with a 5-day menu to ease grocery shopping and food prep.

  • Try a Ready-To-Drink PKU formula if unable to mix formula at school.*

Katie Maguire is an adult with PKU.  She is currently a second grade school teacher.

*Important:  You must consult a metabolic healthcare professional prior to making any changes in your child’s PKU diet plan.

__________

Looking for a new Back-To-School PKU Formula?  For a limited time:

tote-offer

Get Creative with PhenylAde GMP for PKU

View Product Details

View Product Details

PhenylAde GMP Drink Mix is available in a great tasting neutral flavor (Original) or a mild vanilla flavor (Vanilla), but for people who like to get creative this formula can be turned into additional flavors.

Try one - Try them all!

Try one – Try them all!

Simply mix serving (33.3 g) with 5 – 6 fl oz (150 mL – 180 mL) and then customize to your favorite flavor.

Here are some additional great tasting recipes featuring PhenylAde GMP Drink Mix.

GMP recipes

phenylade-gmp-drink-mix-nutrition

Some people may use this product as their main PKU formula or just as part of their PKU diet plan.

Talk to your metabolic healthcare professional to see if PhenylAde GMP Drink Mix is right for you or your child.

GMP_SAMPLE_button

 View other great product for the dietary management of Phenylketonuria (PKU) at www.medicalfood.com

 

NOTE:   *Always consult your metabolic dietitian or physcian prior to making any changes to your PKU diet plan and to see if PhenylAde GMP is right for you.

 

Making the Most of Your Meal

Satisfaction from food or a meal is something everyone wants. Although many foods may be restricted or limited on a low protein diet, you do not have to compromise taste. Selecting the  foods you eat involves a variety of factors. We choose foods based on taste and smell, in addition to texture, sight and culture.

To make the most of your meal, begin by identifying what you crave, like spicy, sweet, crunchy or salty. This will make your meal more satisfying.Here are some tips to help you make the most of your meal.

  • Spicy: Add seasonings that can add a kick. For example, add cracked pepper, crushed red pepper or hot sauce to steamed vegetables to give a familiar item a new twist.

  • Sweet & Tangy:  Satisfy your sweet and tangy craving with grilled pineapple topped with BBQ sauce on a low protein bun. You can also add mandarin oranges and Italian dressing to a garden salad for added flavor and tang.

  • Crunchy: With a little creativity you can add a snap to any dish. Make your own salad iStock_000015639017Mediumcroutons with low protein bread. Season them in a variety of ways by using garlic powder, cayenne pepper or Italian herbs depending on your personal desire for savory or spice. Another great way to add crunch is to include raw vegetables, like cucumbers or carrots slices to a salad or sandwich.

  • Salty: Salt is among the most popular taste craving. Although highly desired, salt is an ingredient to be used in moderation. A little bit goes a long way. To satisfy your craving for salt, try slicing fresh potatoes very thin and sprinkling with garlic and a touch of sea salt. Bake them until crisp for a satisfying addition to your meal or snack.  

  • Smooth and Creamy: Create your own creamy low protein dip with your favorite seasonings for a flavorful way to enjoy Low Protein Crackers or fresh cut vegetables. You can also include a sweet treat at the end of your meal to help satisfy your need for something smooth and creamy.

Get Creative with PhenylAde™ 60

You are busy, so don’t let your PKU formula slow you down.   Grab a store bought (protein-free) drink and add PhenylAde 60 to create a custom PKU formula you can enjoy anywhere, anytime!

Check out these great, 1-step recipes featuring PhenylAde 60.

ICED COFFEE

ICED TEA

ORANGE DRINK

REQUEST A SAMPLE NOW

1 serving (16.7 g) of PhenylAde 60:

  • Only 49 Calories

  • 10 g protein equivalent (PE)

  • Low Volume (mix with only 3 fl oz of cold water)

Try It Today!

 

 

 

 

Does your child love low protein pasta?

My child would eat pasta every day, every meal if I let him. It is great he found a food he enjoys, but I want my son to eat more vegetables and other healthy foods that provide fiber and other nutrients.

Here are some ideas to feed your child’s low protein pasta cravings, but to make your low protein pasta last longer and provide more dietary variety.

Soup 

Dicing carrots and celery (the smaller the better for young kids) and simmering in a vegetable broth with low protein pasta added is a low pro and filling lunch or dinner.   311You can use Loprofin Animal Pasta, Rice, or broken Spaghetti to keep it new and exciting.   Fresh dill adds a great ‘soup’ flavor and expand your child’s taste  palate.

Veggie Noodles 

Bulk up your Low Protein Spaghetti by mixing 278with Zucchini or Yellow Squash noodles. With a spiral vegetable slicer this only takes minutes and can really satisfy a bigger appetite.

 Spicy Vegetables over Low Pro Rice Pasta

You can do so many different meals with fresh or frozen cauliflower and carrots, which are Vegetable Curryboth naturally quite low in protein. Often, people on a low protein diet enjoy spice. Check out this recipe for Indian Curry with Loprofin Rice.

 Dish it out slow 

I often serve my son a small amount of pasta, which he gobbles up. Then ask him to eat 3-4 bites of the vegetables on his plate. Once done I serve another small portion of pasta and repeat. All children are motivated differently, but that love of pasta usually is an incentive to eat more veggies at meal time.

 Roll it up 

Kids love to eat with their hands (or at least my son does). Use Loprofin Lasagna to make a salad roll-up or other roll-up filled with veggies. Try filling a pasta roll-up with a blend of mashed potato and mashed cauliflower for a yummy kid friendly dinner entree.

Loprofin_Pastas

 

Order Loprofin Low Protein Pasta online at medicalfood.com

 

Written by Sandy Simons, MA, RD, CHES

Flying with Formula – Tips for your Next Trip

Flying with Formula – Tips for your Next Trip

airplane girl image

If you are planning a flying vacation, before you book, contact your airline’s customer service department to notify them of your travel requirements as soon as you can.  Airline policies regarding travelling with metabolic formula will differ so it is worth checking with a customer service representative before you arrive at the airport.

Airplane food is generally not PKU or low protein diet-friendly so you may need to pack (or purchase prior to boarding) any food or snacks you think you might need during the flight.

If you are booking an international flight you will need to order a special meal. Please note that even meals listed as low-protein or vegetarian/vegan may not be low enough in protein for the PKU diet, so explain your dietary requirements clearly.

Airline Tips

  • Always take a travel letter from your clinic explaining your medical condition, especially for international travel

  • Always pack extra PKU or metabolic formula in your carry-on bag in case of delays

  • Do not mix PKU or metabolic formula powders with liquid until you go past the security screening checkpoint

  • Keep your PKU or metabolic formula in its original sealed containers (packages, cans or sachets)

  • Take a copy of your child’s diet prescription with you

  • Take plenty of snacks for the flight

Useful PKU Traveler’s Tip

  • It may be useful to switch to a powdered PKU or metabolic formula when travelling abroad, to reduce your overall luggage weight. However, ready-to-drink pouches that don’t require mixing are also particularly convenient when traveling. Contact your dietitian for more information on these options

  • If you are traveling overseas, ask your metabolic healthcare professional team for information on where low-protein food supplies can be obtained in your destination country

  • If you are shipping your PKU or metabolic formula or food to a hotel prior to your arrival, be sure to label the box clearly with your name and arrival date on the package. Call and alert the hotel that a shipment will be arriving for you.

*Reference Source: My PKU Binder. National PKU Alliance. Chapter 11: Traveling, Page 88-89.

Why can’t I just follow a low protein diet?

The simplest answer is because you need protein.  Following a low protein diet without formula could lead to protein deficiency. You may also lack energy and develop an array of secondary health problems.

PKU formula  provides phenylalanine-free protein.  Since all natural food, with the exception of pure fat and sugar, contain some PHE, you must watch your total food intake. If you only eat foods that are low in protein you body may not get enought daily protein.  In addition, eating larger portions of foods that are ‘lower’ in protein can still add up to up more phenylalanine than you can tolerate in a day, resulting in high blood PHE levels.

Formula allows you to take in PHE-free protein and calories to help you meet your daily needs.   PKU formula can also help you feel less hungry.   Controling hunger is important becasue despite your best efforts to only eat low protein, excess hunger may lead you to consume some foods that are higher in protein or larger portions.

Don’t forget – drinking PKU formula also provides a balance of all the other amino acids (building blocks of protein) you need plus tyrosine which is an essential amino acid (needed from food) for those with PKU.

If you are currently not drinking formula and only watching what you eat, assess the reasons why you are not going ‘all in’ on your PKU diet.

  • Are you uncertain if your insurance covers formula or have you been denied in the past?
  • Do you recall from childhood hating your formula and not wanting to drink it?
  • Just stopped re-ordering for no good reason at all?

If any of these ring a bell, let Nutricia help you.

We offer a complimentary samples and a staff of trained coverage specialist that can help navigate your insurance to see if you have coverage and help find a local supplier.

Don’t delay – getting back on track and including PKU formula in your diet will be one decision you will not regret.

Request a free PKU product sample at www.medicalfood.com


Posted by: Sandy Simons, MA, RD, CHES

Sandy is a Registered Dietitian and Certified Health Education Specialist. She received her graduate training at Columbia University’s Teacher College in New York. She has been working on the industry side of metabolic nutrition for the past 11 years and is often seen at patient events around the country. This post is based on an excerpt from My PKU Toolkit: A Transition Guide to Adult PKU Management.

Metabolic Disorders – Talking to your young child

What to say to your child

While your child is not old enough to manage their metabolic disorder alone, it is valuable for them to begin to better understand their diet and treatment. When speaking with your child about their metabolic disorder, the following tips may be helpful:

  • Use simple examples to explain ideas
    For example, when explaining to your child why their metabolic diet is important, it may be helpful to relate the diet to that of a food allergy. Speak with your metabolic team who will also have information about books to read to your child to help him or her understand special diets.
  • Let your child know they can say “no”
    If you haven’t already, teach your child to ask you before eating unfamiliar foods, and that it is OK to say no to anyone who offers food that is unfamiliar or off limits.
  • Tell your child it isn’t his or her fault
    A child may not understand why he or she has metabolic disorder when others do not, and may think that he or she did something to ‘deserve’ it. Explain to your child that everyone is born with different qualities, such as hair and eye color, and a metabolic disorder is something that people are born with, not something that anyone causes. Reinforce to your child that he or she is special, and that this special way of eating is to keep him or her healthy.
  • Stay positive.
    Sending the right message about foods and treatment is important. It is better to talk about off-limit foods as “high-protein,” “no,” “red” or “stop” foods rather than “bad” or “naughty” foods. Help your child accept and manage their metabolic disorder as he or she grows. Never say anything negative about the food or formula to your child. This special way of eating is to keep him or her healthy.
  • You’re not alone
    Talk to your child about other people you know who are on a special diet, even if they are adults, so your child knows that he or she is not the only one on a special diet.   Get involved!   Go to a local metabolic or National event.

Click here to view upcoming events and metabolic support groups across the nation.

 

*Reference Source:Adapted from – My PKU Binder. National PKU Alliance. Chapter 5: Ages 3 to 6 Years, Page 41.

Eating Out on a Low Protein Diet

Although it can be easier to prepare low protein meals at home, this can restrict your work and social activities. Fortunately, many eating places are beginning to realize that an increasing number of people follow “special diets”.

Many of the larger restaurant chains state that they will try and cater for customers on a special diet whenever possible. To get further information from a particular company contact their Customer Service helpline or check their website.

RESTAURANT TIPS

  • Try and give advanced notice to the restaurant whenever possible
  • When explaining your diet, try not to get caught up in a long list of “I can’t have” foods
  • Offer a few ideas of possible dishes you can eat and recipes if necessary
  • Ask if you can bring in your own low protein products such as pasta or pizza bases if this is suitable

EATING ON THE GO
1. Cafes/sandwich shops

Small cafes that make things up from scratch can prove useful (especially if they get to know you!).  Ask if nutritional information is available to find out ingredients /protein content of items.

Possible snack ideas

-Salad
-Fruit
-Tomatoes on toast*
-Chips*
-Jacket potato* and butter

2. Fast food outlets

Some larger, well known fast food chains, provide nutritional content leaflets  for customers in the shop or online access nutrition information.

Possible snack ideas

-Salad (if available)
-Chips*
-Onion rings*
-Hash browns*
– Most veggie burgers are NOT suitable, as they are high in protein.

3. Cafeterias at work or school

Some cafeterias can be quite flexible so it is worth asking if they can cook or re-heat some of your low protein foods. If the cafeteria food choices are limited it may be easier to take a packed lunch in.

Possible snack ideas

-Salad/vegetables
-Fruit
-Baked Potato (avoid mashed potato as it is likely to contain milk)
 *Weigh out as usual

Note: Each condition may vary in tolerance for specific foods that contain protein, even if low in protein. Always speak with your metabolic dietitian or healthcare provider before adding new foods or changing your metabolic diet in any way.