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At what age should I introduce solid foods?

At what age should I introduce solid foods?Feeding child

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) currently recommends gradually introducing solid foods when a baby is about 6 months old.1

**Always consult your metabolic healthcare professional before introducing new foods or changing your child’s low protein diet.

How do I know if my baby is ready to eat solids?

The following tips may help2

  • Is your baby’s tongue-thrust reflex gone or diminished?
    This reflex prevents infants from choking on foreign objects, but also causes them to push food out of their mouths. Ask your pediatrician or metabolic dietitian.
  • Can your baby support his/her own head?
    To eat solid food, an infant needs good head and neck control and should be able to sit up unassisted in a high chair.
  • Is your baby interested in food?
    A 6-month-old baby who stares and grabs at your food at dinnertime is clearly ready for some variety.

What should I know about first foods?

Until now your baby is only used to liquids so it is essential that the first foods offered are a smooth, runny purée. First solids should be bland, easy to swallow and easy to digest. Your baby can progress to a thicker purée once they become used to the runny texture.

What types of food should I offer?

Check with your metabolic dietitian which foods are best for your baby.  Most parents begin with rice cereal mixed with formula and gradually introduce other foods. Homemade purées are inexpensive and easy to make. Fruit and vegetables can be cooked in a small amount of water until soft and then puréed using a hand blender or food processor. Ready-to-eat first foods and baby cereals are also available in the grocery store. Once you have introduced single purees to your baby you can try mixing different combinations for variety e.g. sweet potato and carrot, or apple and pear.

How much should I give my baby to eat?

At first, only offer very small amounts (about 1-2 teaspoons at a single meal). Gradually more food can be offered. When your baby is taking a reasonable amount of solids at a single meal (about 6-10 teaspoons) you can introduce solids at a second meal in the day and then at a third.

Suitable Low Protein Baby Foods2

6-8 Months Old

  • Apple sauce
  • Very small pieces of soft fruit
  • Some cereals
  • Soft cooked vegetables such as carrots or squash

9-12 Months Old

FRUITS

Fresh

  • Wash thoroughly.
  • Remove skins and seeds.
  • Cut into small, bite-size pieces or thin sticks (i.e. quarter grapes).
  • At one year, include unpeeled ripe fruits, berries, pears and nectarines.

Frozen/Canned

  • Look for fruits packed in their own juices.
  • Avoid fruits canned in heavy syrup.
  • Frozen fruits are soothing to teething gums.

Dried

  • Pitted or seedless prunes, apples, apricots, peaches, and dates.
  • Avoid raisins, which can cause choking.

Examples: Apple, Apricot, Avocado, Banana, Berry Grape, Kiwi, Mango, Melon, Nectarine, Orange, Papaya, Peach, Pear, Plum.

VEGETABLES2

Vegetables can be served hot or cold, but all will need to be cooked.

Fresh

  • Wash thoroughly.
  • Raw vegetables are difficult to chew, swallow, and digest.
  • Cook until tender and easily pierced with a fork.
  • Cut into small pieces, long thin strips, or grate.

Canned or Jarred

  • Be careful of the amount of sodium, choose low sodium if possible.
  • Rinse the can or jar before opening.
  • Can be served directly from the can, cut to appropriate size.

Frozen

  • Must be cooked until tender and cut to appropriate size.

**Be sure to discuss PHE or protein tracking an your child’s daily allowance prior to proving any new foods.

References:
1. American Academy of Pediatrics Web Site. Web. 03 Mar. 2010. http://www.aap.org/
2. Eat Right Stay Bright. Guide for Hyperphenylalanemia. L Bernstein and C Freehauf. Chapter 1. Pages 56-58

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